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The Fungi Factor.

The Fungi Factor.

With my recent incapacitation I’ve been forced to enjoy my wood as a spectator for a change. 
Thankfully most of the work takes place in the winter months so I haven’t got behind with my plans.
I have been popping down quite regularly to keep an eye on it, and to enjoy the changing of the seasons. It’s very nice to just wander around rather than spend my time working away like a demented beaver.
Long gone are the tumultuous swathes of spring flowers. The soil is becoming damp underfoot, the woodland floor is carpeted with a million acorns, and the leaves are started to change & fall.
August and September have seen a proliferation of fungi blooms, some of which, as you will see from the photographs, have been spectacular. I like fungi, a lot. It’s fundamentally important to the health of the wood, and I seem to have quite a variety. I am, however, hopeless at identifying individual species, but I do enjoy spotting new ones.

Have a look at these beauties.
I should get the all clear to start doing the hard work again in mid-November and I have a few pressing tasks to get on with; two fallen Oaks along with some large fallen limbs need clearing and logging, a new log store is required after local idiots torched the last one, some footpaths need all-weathering with stone from around the wood, and there are one or two bridges to be built too. Notwithstanding the ongoing bramble clearance. I’ve plenty to get on with and I can’t wait to get started.

 



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Consume less, live more. Plant more trees.



About The Author

Neil Cottam

Neil is the founder of Chase The Rainbow. He has spent a lifetime exploring the outdoors, from a childhood climbing trees and scrambling his bike around old pit heads to hiking in the Himalaya and backpacking around Europe and Asia.

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